Last post, we began discussing the home improvement shows of the DIY network. A network dedicated to helping everyone fix up their homes without help (apologies to all of you contractors), it is filled with shows on how to fix nearly everything the home owner can think to fix. Unlike general home improvement shows, the programs featured on the DIY network are geared towards the specifics and not each show is perfect for every person (thus, it's okay if sometimes you change the channel). But, for those of you looking for guidance, chances are there are at least a few shows on the DIY network that can give you a helping hand.


Ask this Old House: Have you ever wanted to phone a house and ask how it got that sparkling bathroom or that leak free plumbing? Have you ever wanted to take a condo out for dinner to inquire about its wonderful new windows and stain free carpet? The answer to both these questions is probably, and hopefully, no. But, nonetheless, Ask this Old House gives you this opportunity. Instead of focusing on large, overall - and overwhelming - projects, as the series This Old House has done in the past, Ask this Old House focuses on the minor, common home improvement problems that can be fixed by the novice handyman. From things like drafty doors to making a home more energy efficient, the hosts of Ask This Old House provide information sure to save any homeowner time, money, and a tool box of frustration.


Kitchen Renovations: Kitchen Renovations is a show about, you guessed it, renovating your kitchen. For anyone who has ever looked at their kitchen and wanted a second serving of style or a scoop of fashion, this show is for you. Hosted by Paul Ryan, Kitchen Renovations takes viewers into the world of dining possibilities. On the menu includes things like countertops, flooring, and appliances. Not only does this show teach people how to improve the layout and design without a lot of cost, but it also ignites ideas in the minds of home owners. Kitchen Renovations is the show to watch for those hungry for something new.


Sweat Equity teaches the home owner how to capitalize on the value of their house. By teaching you what home improvement projects to avoid (do you really need to put a marble floor in the storage room closet?) and what home improvement projects will get the most monetary return, Sweat Equity allows you to focus on certain projects and ignore the others. Hosted by Amy Matthews, this show solicits the knowledge of experts and helps home owners learn how to perform their projects without professional help. At the end of each episode, Sweat Equity reveals how much a particular home went up in value. For those who want to sell, it's a perfect resource, even if the improvement to your home makes you change your mind on selling.